Frequently Asked Questions

Select a FOA to view questions and answers for the specific funding opportunity. Alternatively select "Non-FOA related items" to view system FAQ items.

Question 1: Do the two FOA’s released today fund electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) infrastructure?
Answer 1:

As stated in Section III.F. Questions Regarding Eligibility (page 31) of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), “DOE will not make eligibility determinations for potential Applicants prior to the date on which applications to this FOA must be submitted. The decision of whether to submit an application in response to this FOA lies solely with the Applicant.

However, for your purposes in making that decision, we offer the following based on the limited information provided in your question:

As described in Executive Summary (page 1) and Section I.A. (page 6) of the Funding Opportunity announcement (FOA), Clean Energy Technology Deployment on Tribal Lands – 2022 (DE-FOA-0002774), applications are being solicited to: (1) install clean energy generating system(s) and energy efficiency measure(s) for Tribal Building(s) (Topic Area 1); or, (2) deploy community-scale clean energy generating system(s) or energy storage on Tribal Lands (Topic Area 2); or, (3) install integrated energy system(s) for autonomous operation (independent of the traditional centralized electric power grid) to power a single or multiple essential tribal facilities during emergency situations or for tribal community resilience (Topic Area 3).

Therefore, unless the EVSE infrastructure meets the Topic Areas above and as described in the FOA document, it would not meet the intent of the FOA.

If this response does not fully answer your questions, please submit another more specific question, providing additional information.

Question 2: Can a tribal government apply if we are not a federally recognized tribe?
Answer 2:

No, tribal governments not federally recognized are not eligible for funding. Specifically, per Section III.A. of the Funding Opportunity Annoucnement (beginning on page 23) “eligibility for award under this FOA is restricted to: (1) an Indian Tribe; (2) Intertribal Organization; or (3) Tribal Energy Development Organization; and (4) on whose Tribal Lands the project(s) will be located.

 

Where,

 

““Indian Tribe,” for the purposes of this FOA and as defined in in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. § 5304),2 means any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688) [ 43 U.S.C. § 1601, et seq.], which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. See below for further definition.

 

For the purposes of this FOA, an eligible Indian tribe, band, nation or other organized group or community (including Alaska Native villages), must be federally recognized as listed in Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive Services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs, published by the Department of Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs in the Federal Register on January 28, 2022, 87 FR 19.”

Question 3: Can you please tell me if a Tribal Authority Letter would be acceptable in lieu of a Tribal Resolution? The Nation has written in to its constitution the authority for our Executive, the Governor, to unilaterally approve an application to funding opportunities via Tribal Authority Letter, as opposed to using a Tribal Resolution, which goes through a lengthier process with our tribal legislature.
Answer 3:

The form of commitment and cost sharing is dependent on the entity applying as the applicant and the authorities that entity has been granted. If the applicant is an Indian tribe that has a Tribal Council, the applicant must submit an executed Tribal Council Resolution – a Tribal Authority Letter is not sufficient. As set forth in the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), Section IV.C.6., Applicant Tribal Council Resolution or Declaration of Commitment and Cost Sharing File, if an Indian tribe is the applicant, “that statement of commitment and cost sharing must be in the form of an executed Tribal Council Resolution, unless an Indian Tribe does not have a Tribal Council. If an Indian Tribe does not have a Tribal Council, the statement of commitment and cost sharing may be in a format other than a Tribal Council Resolution and must include evidence of the statutory or other legal authority authorizing that form of commitment in lieu of a Tribal Council Resolution. Such evidence must establish that the commitment submitted carries the same level of Tribal leadership commitment as a Tribal Council Resolution.”

If, however, an application is being submitted on behalf of Indian Tribe(s) by an authorized Tribal Organization, as that term is defined on page 24 of the FOA, “evidence of that authority is required as part of the application, along with a declaration (or resolution) from the Tribal Organization, and a letter of commitment from all other project participants. Evidence may include, but is not limited to, a constitution, resolution, ordinance, executive order, charter, or other legal documentation (see IV.C.5., Eligibility Statements and Evidence).”

Whereas, if an application is being submitted by a Tribal Energy Development Organization, as that term is defined on page 24 of the FOA, the FOA states on page 40, ”the statement of commitment and cost sharing may be in the form of a declaration or resolution signed by an authorized representative able to commit the entity.

Question 4: Are Tribal organizations other than federally recognized tribes eligible as indicated on Grants.gov?
Answer 4:

Yes, Tribal organizations  other than federally recognized tribes are eligible applicants under this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), as specified under Section III.A.

Section III.A. (page 23) of the FOA states, “In accordance with EPAct 2005 authorities and consistent with 2 CFR § 910.126(b), eligibility for award under this FOA is restricted to: (1) an Indian Tribe; (2) Intertribal Organization; or (3) Tribal Energy Development Organization; and (4) on whose Tribal Lands the project(s) will be located.” See the definitions in Section III.A. or Appendix A of the FOA. Additionally, as stated on page 24 of the FOA, “[a]pplications may also be submitted on behalf of Indian Tribe(s) by an authorized “Tribal Organization”, provided evidence of that authority is included as part of the application.”

Therefore, “Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)” as specified on Grants.gov are eligible, provided that the Native American tribal organization is an Intertribal Organization or Tribal Energy Development Organization as defined in Section III.A. of the FOA. Further, Tribal Organizations (as that term is defined on page 24 of the FOA) are not directly eligible; however, they may submit an application on behalf of an Indian tribe (as defined on page 23 of the FOA), provided they have evidence of that authority.

Non-federally recognized tribes and tribal organizations, other than the ones identified in Section III.A. of the FOA, are not eligible applicants.

Question 5: Are we able to use DOE funds to install solar on the homes of Tribal Members? These are homes that are not owned by the Tribe but are on Tribal land. Would the Tribe need to retain ownership of the solar, or could it be owned by the Tribal Member? If the Tribe needs to maintain ownership, is it possible to implement a reduced-cost lease program for the Tribal Members for an extended period of years?
Answer 5:

As defined on page 9 and in Appendix A of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), “Tribal Buildings may include, but are not limited to, tribal member homes, schools, community buildings, clinics/hospitals, tribal government buildings, fire stations, police stations, radio stations, washaterias, utility facilities (such as water/wastewater systems), or tribal businesses.” [Emphasis added]

If the homes are not owned by the Tribe, the Recipient (if an award is made) shall include the paragraph below in its contract(s) or other agreement(s) with each homeowner or other entity receiving solar equipment with funding provided through this Agreement:

“This contract is subject to the use and disposition requirements contained in 2 CFR §200.313. These requirements include, but are not limited to, restrictions against encumbrance of the solar equipment (e.g., the homeowner will not use the equipment as collateral for a loan) without approval of the Department of Energy, and the homeowner’s recognition that the Department of Energy retains a property interest in the solar equipment until such time as the equipment has a fair market value of $5,000 or less.”

The type of contract(s) or agreement(s) the Recipient (if an award is made) makes with each homeowners or other entity receiving the solar equipment is not under the purview of DOE; it must, however, include the statement above.

Title to the equipment would conditionally vest with the Recipient (if an award is made). Subject to the conditions provided in 2 CFR 200.313, title to equipment (property) acquired under a Federal award will conditionally vest upon acquisition with the non-Federal entity. The non-Federal entity cannot encumber this property without approval of the Federal awarding agency and must follow the requirements of 2 CFR 200.313 before disposing of the property. Equipment must be used by the non-Federal entity in the program or project for which it was acquired as long as it is needed, whether or not the project or program continues to be supported by the Federal award. When no longer needed for the originally authorized purpose, the equipment may be used by programs supported by DOE in the priority order specified in 2 CFR 200.313(c)(1)(i) and (ii). Management requirements, including inventory and control systems, for equipment are provided in 2 CFR 200.313(d).

Question 6: My question is what would we need to do to put forth a proposal that meets the “detailed feasibility study” criteria in the RFP.
Answer 6:

For Topic Area 1 and Topic Area 2 (see Section I.B.), the comprehensive feasibility study is a required application document which must clearly identify the need, demonstrate the rationale for selecting the proposed clean energy technology as opposed to other options, demonstrate the availability of the resource, and demonstrate the technical and economic viability of the proposed clean energy.

For Topic Area 3 (see Section I.B.), the comprehensive feasibility study is a required application document which must clearly identify the need, demonstrate the rationale for selecting the proposed integrated energy system(s) as opposed to other options, demonstrate the technical and economic viability of the proposed integrated energy system(s).

Further, for Topic Area 2.a. and Topic Area 3 (see pages 15 and 17), applications “must demonstrate the availability of the renewable energy resource for the life of the project, and applications proposing geothermal, or biomass systems must also demonstrate the sustainability of the resource.”

The application, including the comprehensive feasibility study, will be reviewed relative to the technical review criteria under Section V.A.

Question 7: I have some questions regarding the Tribal Grants / Funding that are available. 1) Are there any Tribal Grants currently available regarding Energy projects such as; Solar, Battery Storage, Microgrid, or EV Charging? 2) Is there a cost-sharing and or matching requirements for the Tribal Grants? 3) Can a third-party help manage the grant application process and funding disbursements for the Tribal Businesses, Colleges, etc.?
Answer 7:

I have some questions regarding the Tribal Grants / Funding that are available. 

  1. Regarding funding opportunities for Indian tribes, the Office of Indian currently has two Funding Opportunities Announcements (FOAs) current open, as follows:
  1. Deploy clean energy technology on Tribal lands (DE-FOA-0002774)  

Applications due February 9, 2023

Information webinar November 29, 2022 (1:00-3:00 Mountain)

 

  1. Power unelectrified Tribal buildings (DE-FOA-0002771)

Applications due February 23, 2023

Information webinar December 1, 2022 (1:00-3:00 Mountain)

 

Please review the FOAs for eligible technologies. You may also wish to explore the DOE Office of Indian Energy’s Current Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy  and Funding - Energy Communities  for other opportunities.

  1. Per the FOAs issued by the DOE Office of Indian Energy under Section III.B., “[u]nless DOE approves a requested cost share reduction, a 20% cost share of the total allowable costs of the project (i.e., the sum of the DOE share, and the Recipient share of allowable costs equals the total allowable cost of the project) is required.”

However, Applicants may request a cost share reduction as part of their application, as set forth in Section III.B. of the FOA documents. As stated under Section III.B.2, “[c]ost share reduction requests of less than 10% of the Total Project Costs will not be considered. Cost share reductions from the required 20% to 10% will be based on financial need, specifically (1) poverty rate, or (2) median household income of the tribal community as a percentage of statewide median household income.”

  1. Regarding a third-party managing the grant application process and funding disbursements, the DOE Office of Indian Energy will only make awards and provide funding to eligible applicants or those eligible to submit an application on behalf of an eligible Indian tribe as defined in the FOA documents (Section III.A.).
Question 8: We would like to know if we can apply for a project in two separate villages on the same application? We would be applying to put battery systems that are almost identical in each village. To us it makes sense to do two in one application to cut down on duplicate administration.
Answer 8:

Per the Executive Summary on page 2 of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) document, “Applicants may submit more than one application to this FOA (including more than one application under a particular Topic Area), provided each application is for a distinctively different project and each application addresses only one Topic Area. Each application must have a distinct title, unique Control Number as assigned by IE-Exchange during the registration process, and be readily distinguishable. Each application must be limited to a single unique and distinct project; unrelated projects cannot be consolidated in a single application.”

Per Section III.F. “DOE will not make eligibility determinations for potential Applicants prior to the date on which applications to this FOA must be submitted. The decision of whether to submit an application in response to this FOA lies solely with the Applicant.”

However, based on the limited information provided, we offer the following in making your decision.

If the projects are in two distinct villages, albeit similar in scope, they would be considered unrelated and cannot be consolidated into a single application.

Question 9: SAM registration, Exchange and Login.gov have been problematic for many remote Alaska tribes who have poor internet and are unable to access the web. Can applications be submitted via email?
Answer 9:

The DOE Office of Indian Energy is unable to accept applications through any other means than IE-Exchange.

For security purposes, two-factor authentication is now required to access IE-Exchange, requiring applicants to create a Login.gov profile. Further, the other required registrations are required to apply for and accept an award. Specifically,

  1. System for Award Management (SAM) registration, including obtaining a Universal Entity Identifier (UEI), is required to apply for and accept a federal award;
  2. FedConnect registration is required to receive federal award documents; and
  3. Grants.gov registration is required in order to receive automatic updates when amendments to the FOA have been posted.

 

Question 10: 1) Per page 1 of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), DOE anticipates making awards with a period of performance of approximately two (2) to four (4) years including the mandatory 12-month verification period. Based on that statement is the DOE equating period of performance with simple payback performance? 2) Regarding the submission of multiple applications (pages 2 and 37 of the FOA document), would the DOE clarify the definition of more than one application. 3) Regarding environmental benefits as identified on page 7 of the FOA document, besides reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxide (NOX), are any other factors required?
Answer 10:
  1. Period of performance as used in the FOA document means the duration of the grant. Therefore, DOE anticipates making grant awards with a period of performance of approximately two (2) to four (4) years including the mandatory 12-month verification period. The period of performance is not associated with the simple payback period.

 

  1. Per page 2 and 37 of the FOA document, “[a]pplicants may submit more than one application to this FOA (including more than one application under a particular Topic Area), provided each application is for a distinctively different project and each application addresses only one Topic Area. Each application must have a distinct title, unique Control Number as assigned by IE-Exchange during the registration process and be readily distinguishable. Each application must be limited to a single unique and distinct project; unrelated projects cannot be consolidated in a single application.”

 

Per Section III.F. of the FOA document, “DOE will not make eligibility determinations for potential Applicants prior to the date on which applications to this FOA must be submitted. The decision of whether to submit an application in response to this FOA lies solely with the Applicant.” As this is a competitive process, the DOE Office of Indian Energy is unable to advise you on how to structure your application(s).

 

However, we offer the following in making your decision:

 

In considering whether to submit one or more than one application, you may want to consider, among other things: the maximum amount of Federal funds per award (see Section II.A. on page 22 of the FOA document), similarity in the type of each project (e.g., lighting, industrial process efficiencies, etc.), the scale of each project (e.g., facility or community scale), and possibly the timing of each proposed project. For instance, if projects are being proposed for existing “Tribal Building(s)” and new “Tribal Building(s)” that are currently being constructed or planned to be constructed during the proposed grant period, the timing of new construction might be a consideration on whether the project for the new “Tribal Building(s)” is proposed under a separate application. Further, you may wish to consider similar project scope such as combining facility-scale projects, combining all lighting projects, or combining community-scale projects, with each under a separate application. The factors described above are not exclusive but are some that you may wish to consider in determining your proposal strategy.

 

  1. Beyond a few examples such as reduction in emissions and reduction in fossil fuel used, the FOA document and the Technical Volume template do not specify the specific environmental factors to be considered. The applicable criteria to be used in evaluating each application include the “[e]xtent to which the proposed project provides economic (e.g., money saved, jobs, etc.) or other benefits to the Indian Tribe(s) and tribal community” (page 56) and the significant outcomes (page 57) which include:
  • Amount of energy saved, displaced, or generated;
  • Economic benefits (e.g., money saved, people trained, jobs created);
  • Environmental benefits (e.g., reduction in emissions); and
  • Other outcomes (e.g., replicability, resiliency, reliability, environmental stewardship,
  • specific energy goal(s) met, step toward energy independence).

 

Question 11: I’m sitting in the webinar for the new Clean Energy grants (DE-FOA-0002774) and there is a requirement of a feasibility study. Can you provide some guidance of what would be acceptable for DOE in this regard? I was planning on having a private solar development company do a feasibility study about the plan I want to propose for this grant. Is that theoretically acceptable and is there a requirement as to the exact form the feasibility study must take?
Answer 11:

Please see the answer to question 6 on the FAQs webpage and the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) document under the Topic Area of interest for the requisite content of the required comprehensive feasibility study.

The FOA does not specify who should complete the comprehensive feasibility study, provided it contains the requisite content and demonstrates the technical viability of the proposed project (see Criterion 2 under Section V.A. for the technical review criteria). Further, there is no specific format prescribed for the require comprehensive feasibility study.  

Question 12: Hello, is Geothermal drilling an eligible funding activity in the FOA? I could not distinguish if it would be considered construction.
Answer 12:

Per Section III.F. (page 32), “DOE will not make eligibility determinations for potential Applicants prior to the date on which applications to this FOA must be submitted. The decision of whether to submit an application in response to this FOA lies solely with the Applicant.”

However, for your purposes in making that decision, we offer the following based on the limited information provided:

Per Section I.C. of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), the following applications are specifically not of interest, ”[a]pplications that fall outside the technical parameters specified in Section I.B. of the FOA” and “[a]pplications proposing studies, design, and engineering (excluding final design and engineering), or development (pre-construction) activities; or any other activity which does not directly result in the installation of equipment to generate electricity and/or heating or cooling, reduce energy use, or enhance energy storage and delivery infrastructure.”

Specifically, geothermal drilling typically involves identifying and assessing the geothermal resource and would not, in and of itself, result in the installation of equipment to generate electricity and/or heating or cooling. Further, as stated under Section I.B. relative to Topic Area 2.a. (page 15) and Topic Area 3 (page 17), applications “must demonstrate the availability of the renewable energy resource for the life of the project, and applications proposing geothermal, or biomass systems must also demonstrate the sustainability of the resource.”

Based on the above, geothermal drilling would not, in and of itself, result in the installation of equipment to generate electricity and/or heating or cooling and would be required prior to submitting an application to demonstrate the availability and sustainability of the resource.  A geothermal drilling project, therefore, would not be of interest under this FOA.

 

 

Question 13: Are Tribes permitted to work with National Labs as subcontractors/sub-grantees for this FOA?
Answer 13:

There are no prohibitions against an eligible applicant working with a DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs), including DOE laboratories, or non-DOE/NNSA FFRDCs. For purposes of this response, the terms National Laboratory and FFRDC are used interchangeably.

However, project involvement of DOE/NNSA FFRDCs or non-DOE/NNSA FFRDCs comes with additional requirements. The use of an FFRDC must be consistent with its authority under its federal contract. Specifically, the cognizant Contracting Officer for the FFRDC must authorize, in writing, the use of the FFRDC on the proposed project and this authorization must be submitted with the application. The following wording is acceptable for this authorization:

Authorization is granted for the (insert National Laboratory name) to participate in the proposed project. The work proposed for the (insert National Laboratory name) is consistent with or complementary to the missions of the (insert National Laboratory name) and will not adversely impact execution of the federally assigned programs at the (insert National Laboratory name).

Additionally, the value of and funding for the FFRDC portion of the work may or may not be included in the award to a successful applicant. Rather, DOE will fund a DOE/NNSA FFRDC contractor through the DOE Annual Operating Plan (AOP) and non-DOE/NNSA FFRDCs will be funded through an interagency agreement with the sponsoring agency. However, in some cases, DOE FFRDCs are funded through a subrecipient agreement with the prime recipient of the federal award. The FFRDC then executes an agreement with the prime recipient to arrange work structure, project execution, and any other matters. Regardless of these arrangements, the entity that applied as the prime recipient for the project will remain the prime recipient for the project.

Because FFRDCs are funded by the federal government, costs they incur generally may not be used to meet the FOA cost share requirement. Although the FFRDC portion of the work is usually excluded from the award to a successful applicant, the applicant’s cost share requirement will be based on the total cost of the project, including the applicant’s, the subrecipient’s, and the FFRDCs portions of the project.

Further, the prime recipient will be the responsible authority regarding the settlement and satisfaction of all contractual and administrative issues including, but not limited to, disputes and claims arising out of any agreement between the prime recipient and the FFRDC contractor.

 

Question 14: We would like to provide a battery storage system for one of our tribal nation customer. To my knowledge, there may not be a battery storage manufacturer that exists within the Buy America Guidelines. Is there a way to provide a battery storage system that does not fit the Buy America Guidelines?
Answer 14:

Per the Buy America requirements prescribed under Section 70914 of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and as included in Appendix C of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) beginning on page 93, “none of the project funds (includes federal share and Recipient cost share) may be used for a project for infrastructure unless:

  1. all iron and steel used in the project are produced in the United States--this means all manufacturing processes, from the initial melting stage through the application of coatings, occurred in the United States;
  2. all manufactured products used in the project are produced in the United States—this means the manufactured product was manufactured in the United States; and the cost of the components of the manufactured product that are mined, produced, or manufactured in the United States is greater than 55 percent of the total cost of all components of the manufactured product, unless another standard for determining the minimum amount of domestic content of the manufactured product has been established under applicable law or regulation; and
  3. all construction materials are manufactured in the United States—this means that all manufacturing processes for the construction material occurred in the United States.”

Please review Appendix C of the FOA beginning on page 93 to see whether the proposed project meets the definition of infrastructure and confirm that there are no battery storage systems available that meet the requirements above. If both apply, per Appendix C (page 95), “[i]n limited circumstances, DOE may waive the application of the Buy America requirements where DOE determines that: (1) applying the Buy America requirements would be inconsistent with the public interest; (2) the types of iron, steel, manufactured products, or construction materials are not produced in the United States in sufficient and reasonably available quantities or of a satisfactory quality; or (3) the inclusion of iron, steel, manufactured products, or construction materials produced in the United States will increase the cost of the overall project by more than 25 percent. If an Applicant is seeking a waiver of the Buy America requirements, it may submit a waiver request after it has been notified of its selection for negotiation of award.” [Emphasis added] See Appendix C of the FOA (page 95) for the content of a waiver request.

Question 15: A question has come up as we've been reviewing the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) document (DOE-FOA-0002774). Relative to Topic Area 3.a., if awarded the maximum funding amount of $2 million, can that grant award be used to help fund a larger project? For example, if a project costs >$10 million, can the $2 million of DOE funding go towards the larger project cost, with the remaining project cost covered by a financing entity? If yes, what would be the best way to structure that application? If the financing entity is eligible to apply under this grant (as a "Tribal Energy Development Organization"), should that entity be the applicant?
Answer 15:

Per Section III.F. (page 32) of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), “DOE will not make eligibility determinations for potential Applicants prior to the date on which applications to this FOA must be submitted. The decision of whether to submit an application in response to this FOA lies solely with the Applicant.” Nor can DOE advise you on the best way to structure that application or who should be the applicant.

However, for your purposes in making that decision, we offer the following based on the limited information provided:

The project proposed under the subject FOA must encompass the entirety of the “Integrated Energy System(s)” project as defined under Section I.B. of the FOA and summarized below, even if the DOE funds would only cover a relatively small percentage of the project costs. Further, even though the FOA requires a minimum cost share of 20%, unless reduced, there is no limit on the maximum amount of cost share that can be contributed to the proposed project.

Specifically for Topic Area 3.a. (page 17), the “Integrated Energy System(s)” under Topic Area 3 must, as a minimum, provide power to Essential Tribal Building(s) and include: (1) clean energy generating system(s); (2) controls and management system(s); and (3) energy storage system(s). Such systems may also include (4) conventional energy generation device(s); however, conventional energy generation device(s) are eligible only if used solely as a dispatchable stand-by power source. Note that some components of the proposed integrated energy system(s) may already exist and, therefore, not all of the components must be proposed for DOE funding; however, the integrated energy system(s) as a whole must meet the requirements under Topic Area 3.”

Therefore, in your example, although the DOE grant award (if one is made) may only provide a relatively small percentage of the larger project costs (>$10 million), the DOE-funded project must encompass the entire “Integrated Energy System(s)” project, not just a segregated portion.

A financing entity, in and of itself, is not an eligible applicant, unless that entity is an Indian Tribe, Intertribal Organization; or Tribal Energy Development Organization, or an eligible entity applying on behalf of an Indian Tribe or Tribes, as defined under Section III.A.

Question 16: I am writing to find out some information regarding your grant opportunity available on grants.gov (DE-FOA-0002771) and (DE-FOA-0002774). I am interested in finding out if there are any additional similar grant opportunities from the past 2 years. Also, I am interested in seeing some copies of proposals that were awarded these opportunities?
Answer 16:

Summaries of all projects funded through DOE’s Office of Indian Energy are posted on its website at Tribal Energy Projects Database | Department of Energy. Besides an interactive map, those funded projects are included in a table which can be sorted by year and technology. Further, a list of projects selected for negotiation of award in 2021 can be found at DOE Awards $12 Million to Tribal Communities to Maximize Deployment of Energy Technology | Department of Energy and those selected for negotiation of award on 2022 can be found at DOE Awards $9 Million to Tribal Communities To Enhance Energy Security And Resilience | Department of Energy.

Copies of applications submitted in response to a competitive Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) are not publicly available.

Question 17: Can Tribes utilize the Investment or Production Tax Credits authorized under the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 as part of the mandatory Cost Share requirement?
Answer 17:

To be eligible as cost share, any investment or production tax credits received under the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 would need to be monetized, received and contributed to the project during the grant period. Additionally, direct payments in lieu of tax credits are not considered federal funding after receipt by a grantee and may also be used as cost share, provided those funds are received and contributed to the project during the grant period.

Please see Section III.B.4., Cost Share Types and Allowability, on page 29 of the funding opportunity announcement for sources of funds which may not be used to meet cost share.

Question 18: Can the planning costs be incorporated into a deployment grant?
Answer 18:

No, planning costs cannot be included in proposed deployment grant applications. As stated under Section I.C., Applications Specifically Not of Interest, “[a]pplications proposing studies, design, and engineering (excluding final design and engineering), or development (pre-construction) activities; or any other activity which does not directly result in the installation of equipment to generate electricity and/or heating or cooling, reduce energy use, or enhance energy storage and delivery infrastructure” are not of interest. [Emphasis added]

Question 19: I am wondering whether higher education institutions can work as subcontractors/sub-grantees of an eligible prime.
Answer 19:

There is no prohibition to higher education institutions being a subcontractor or sub-grantee to an eligible applicant under this funding opportunity announcement.

Question 20: Can the cost of performing the feasibility study be reimbursed or included in the proposal?
Answer 20:

No, the cost of performing a feasibility study cannot be reimbursed or included in an application to the subject Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA). Per Section I.C. of the FOA, Application Specifically Not of Interest, “[a]pplications proposing studies, design, and engineering (excluding final design and engineering), or development (pre-construction) activities; or any other activity which does not directly result in the installation of equipment to generate electricity and/or heating or cooling, reduce energy use, or enhance energy storage and delivery infrastructure” are not of interest. [Emphasis added]

Further, per Section I.B. of the FOA, a comprehensive feasibility study is required as part of the application and therefore, must be completed prior to the submittal of an application. Additionally, per Section III.B. “Except for pre-award costs with prior DOE approval, only cost share contributions made during the period of performance of the grant, if awarded, can be considered. Any costs incurred prior to award selection cannot be considered as cost share or for reimbursement by DOE.”

Question 21: Question 1: When the tribe applies for the grants for energy efficiency measures (EEMs), for example, chiller replacement, variable frequency drive installation, chilled water pumps, domestic hot water heater replacement, etc., is there an energy saving calculation methodology that DOE prefer, for example, New York Standard Approach for Estimating Energy Savings from Energy Efficiency Programs Version 9 (https://www3.dps.ny.gov/W/PSCWeb.nsf/All/72C23DECFF52920A85257F1100671BDD), a bin analysis for the load profile and chiller performance, etc. Question 2: I wonder if there is a preferred utility analysis methodology to calculate the utility rate, for example, blended rate, or non-blended rate. And how many months of utility data is required to calculate the utility rate?
Answer 21:

Question 1: The Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) does not specify any particular methodology for calculating energy savings.

Question 2:  The FOA does not prescribe any particular methodology for calculating the utility rate.